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Deep Murder and the future of softcore movies

Recently, at LAFF (Los Angeles Film Festival) was screened Deep Murder, directed by Nick Corirossi. This horror comedy is set inside the world of soft core pornography. It follows a group of adult film stars and filmmakers who start getting picked off by a killer.

According to the first reviews, the movie not contain sex scenes or full nudity, but only a brief nude scene. The question I asked myself, having followed the production of this film for months by reading Variety and Deadline, was: What would have happened to Deep Murder, if this film was made by those who work in the softcore world?

Deep Murder (2018)

Years ago, we had a movie with a similar plot in the softcore genre: Killing For Love. Directed by Mike Kesey and played by Jay Richardson, Brandy Ledford, Lisa Hasslehurts and Jennifer Burton, this movie tell the story of a group of movie people, director, screenwriter, producer, actors and actresses meet for a weekend at a remote house. Killing for Love was a mixture of sex scenes, killing and a thriller atmosphere that eventually hide a nice twist. But this was not the important thing. The important thing is that Killing for Love was the demonstration that the softcore genre could joke about the own industry, something different from the hardcore genre.

I always thought, even recently, that it would be great to see a movie where the softcore stars are themselves. Imagine a movie where Evan Stone, who has never had sex scenes with Christine Nguyen in the Retromedia movies, it’s trying desperately to court her on set… and she refuses, calling him a peasant. Of course, eventually the two will certainly make sex at the end, but the refusal, based on the reality that the two actors for years have never had love scenes together, could be a card to play.

Imagine a film where Christine Nguyen, in the real life a very sweet girl and loved by fans, in a movie like this play herself as a selfish actress, who treats badly every person on the set and wants to be the star? Or where Rebecca Love, Christine’s great friend in real life, is jealous of her?

A parody? Maybe. But it could be a new way for the softcore genre to look at itself. At a time when this kind of film is dying, it could be something better than the usual plots on sexy aliens or nurses, or girls in bikinis. But who could breathe new life into this kind of production? Brandon Ruckdashel and Andy Espinoza Long have recently shown they have directorial talent.

Even Rebecca Love, despite her project Frank-N-Stein has not seen the light of the day, has shown to have good ideas for the softcore genre, and the guys behind Girls Guns and Blood could be another group of talents for the softcore rebirth.

The problem, at the end, is always the same: money.

Chuck

Sreviews admin

 

 

 

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